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today’s news for Monday, August 15, 2022

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NEWS FROM NASFAA

On Friday, NASFAA submitted comments to the Education Department (ED) on proposed FAFSA survey questions on student gender, race, and ethnicity. ED added these questions as an optional survey to the 2023-24 FAFSA on the Web. ED hopes to glean insight from this survey to inform its development of the 2024-25 FAFSA, when Congress will require ED to ask specific FAFSA questions about the applicant’s sex and race. NASFAA made suggestions for better wording of questions, as well as clearer language on who would have access to gender, race, and ethnicity data and how the data would be used.

On Friday, NASFAA submitted comments to the Department of Education (ED) on its proposed regulatory changes to borrower defense to repayment; pre-dispute arbitration and class action waivers; student loan interest capitalization; loan discharges for total and permanent disability, closed school, and false certification; and the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program. Stay tuned to Today’s News in the upcoming days for a series of articles providing detailed summaries of each topic.

On Friday, NASFAA submitted comments to the Department of Education (ED) on a package of proposed regulations that was negotiated in late 2021 related to college affordability and student loans. This is the first in a series of three articles that will be published this week to delve into the details of the proposal. Today’s article will focus on borrower defense to repayment (BDR), pre-dispute arbitration, and class action waivers.

NASFAA UPDATES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

The satisfactory academic progress (SAP) regulations and the U.S. Department of Education (ED) do not define what office must administer appeals, how or by whom appeals are reviewed (individuals, committees, etc.), who at an institution has the final say in SAP appeals, or if or when an institution can or should override SAP appeal decisions. Therefore, this is at the discretion of school policy. However, there are other principles within Title IV administration that suggest caution if considering such a policy to override an appeal decision. View the full answer to this question to learn more.

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